Guest Post: How to Choose the Right Filters, Your Pump Will Thank You

A filter is a filter is a filter…..right? In our next post by Tim Fabian, we discuss how to choose the right filters for your pump. Now, to Tim.

A filter is a filter is a filter…..right? Not so fast.  There are so many types of filters available today it is hard to understand what all the differences are.  The important thing to remember though, is that not all will work well with your pump.  Just like the cleanliness of the water we drink needs to be clean to sustain our good health, a filter that doesn’t stop the bad stuff from getting into your pump is bad for its health too.  Even filters that have the same nominal micron value aren’t always created equal.

Pump Technology Waterjet Maintenance

Why Not Ultrahigh-Pressure Slurry Jets?

A reader asked about Slurryjet, and why there are no ultrahigh-pressure units out there in the world today cutting in production.

First of all, let’s make sure everyone who has not studied the subject understands what we’re talking about here.  Abrasive waterjets today are created by pressurizing water, forcing it through a small jewel orifice where the pressure is converted to velocity, and then the abrasive particles are metered into a mixing chamber and accelerated like a bullet out of a rifle down the mixing tube.  Abrasive slurry jet is where a water/abrasive slurry is pressurized and pushed through an orifice.  It is inherently more efficient because the water and abrasive are going the same speed, and no momentum transfer from the water to the abrasive is taking place.

How Waterjets Work Pump Technology Waterjet Technology Overview

When Two Cutting Heads Aren’t Better Than One

Having more than one cutting head on an abrasive waterjet should be much more productive than running one head, right?

By understanding waterjet efficiency, and the relationship between pressure and power, you can equip your shop with the most productive system possible. In short, raising the pressure and putting the power through one head is more efficient than running two heads with normal pressure.

Pump Technology Waterjet Technology Overview

The Waterjet Control: Inside the Brain Behind a Waterjet

In 1984 the abrasive waterjet was released as a commercially available product. It was powerful, it was incredibly versatile; but it took a special operator to run it.  Someone who was into it – who had caught the waterjet bug. Why? Because at the time, waterjet wasn’t all that easy to run.

I had the unique opportunity to be such a waterjet operator by getting into abrasive waterjet just one year after it was released.  While in undergrad and grad school running the waterjet laboratory and demo center I could reference basic cut speed tables for what was believed (at that time) to be the best operating parameters. The table included water pressure, orifice size, mixing tube size, abrasive size, abrasive flow rate and the maximum cut speed for a dozen common materials at one or two thickness levels.

How Waterjets Work Programming Waterjet Technology Overview

Standoff Height: How Close Should You Be?

The standoff height is the distance between the tip of the mixing tube and the material. A standoff too high causes dimensional problems and alters the top edge created by the jet as it gradually widens in open air.  Standoff too low risks scratching material on rapid traverse between cut paths, or snapping the tube causing downtime, cost, and angry operators.  Standoff height should be approximately the thickness of a coin (varies depending on your nationality, obviously) – about 0.100” (2.54 mm).

Standoff Height

I guess I could end the blog right here, but I think there are a few more things you might want to know about standoff height.

Waterjet 101 Waterjet Technology Overview